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The Falcon and The Winter Soldier 1×05 “Truth” Highlights

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The truth is, I loved this episode of The Falcon and The Winter Soldier with my whole heart and ugly cried through ninety percent of it. And if you know anything about me, it should be that when I cry, something is amazing. “Truth” was nothing short of that–in its execution, the performances, and the remarkable vulnerability it allowed us to see between our favorite heroes. 

We got moments of quiet comfort, fantastic transparency, and a whole lot of humor effortlessly interwoven in the midst of an episode that was actually darker in its realism. The balance and the heart worked wondrously and now that this is the penultimate, I’m actually sad we don’t have too much more of this. We got Sarah back. We got Isaiah. We got Torres. And it was all that I had asked for during last week’s review.

Tough Love

Sam and Bucky’s partnership is everything I’d hoped it’d be in a scene like this and then some. Whenever there’s a moment of transparency between these two, it’s unmatched compared to any of the fight sequences. Shared vulnerability easily makes for beautiful moments of growth and that’s the case when Bucky apologizes to Sam for not understanding what picking up the shield meant for him as a Black man. And I feel like as a viewer, I owe the same apology. 

(No, I’m not apologizing for being frustrated about the lack of content regarding other characters that got sidelined because of Faux Captain America.)

It’s so easy for us to look into the fantasy world and vocalize just how much we want Sam to be Captain America, but even in this world, Marvel showed us that they wanted to exhibit the importance of racial injustices, and at the same time, for us to understand why something must always be someone’s choice. Sam is, and will always be the most perfect choice to follow Steve’s footsteps—his empathy is beautifully moving and one of, if not the best character traits anyone in the universe possesses. But Sam had to make the choice himself as well.

Bucky’s transparency is also so incredible to see because when Sam gave up the shield, he states that it felt like he lost a part of a family because the shield was the only representation of it left. And in that loss, he believed to have lost goodness, hope and everything that went along with the only sense of security he thought he had. The legacy of the shield is complicated, but so is this friendship and so is everything they have each been through, together and apart.

Which is why Sam’s tough love works so well here because making amends just isn’t about apologizing, it’s about making sure that people’s lives are made easier. It’s not just about apologizing but it’s about making sure that there are actions to back the words. And there’s the promise between them which reveals that Sam has forgiven Bucky—he’s chosen to understand, to look passed the Winter Soldier and towards within. He sees Bucky, he understands Bucky, and he appreciates Bucky.

They work well together in spite of their ridiculousness, the main reason being because they’re each looking for the right answers and how to navigate in the world. And this dynamic, this partnership between “coworkers,” it’s not something I ever want them to change. Please continue being petty how much you actually like each other. Signed, me.

Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie are such astounding scene partners in how they balance moments of vulnerability and heart with their individual quips. It’s why they needed a show like this because at the end of the day, the organic chemistry is too good to pass up on.

“You want to climb out of that hell? Do the work” is exemplary advice through and through that focuses on the running throughout this episode that shows us why the Avengers have differed from other characters, Sam especially because they’ve never taken the easy route.

It’s safe to assume that at this point Steve Rogers has passed away right? The way they both sort of addressed him being gone really implies this. 

Sam Trains, I Cry

No, but seriously, throughout that entire montage I went from being an emotional wreck to consistently fanning myself after watching him decide he’s not going give up the fight. It felt like one of those extraordinary montages where you just understood with every fiber of your being that this person deserves everything, and you hope the world goes out of its way to give it to him. And I mean, I knew Sam deserved the world, I’ll never stop saying this, but there is something about Sam running that’s just such a beautiful to see for what it reveals in his efforts to be the best version of himself possible.

The shield was always meant to be Sam’s–at the right time, in the right place, wherever he throws it, it’ll come back to him and he’ll be ready to catch it. (And I’ll be sitting here crying about it.)

It was especially easy to appreciate it after everything we saw with the scene between him and Sarah! (Blessed be her return. Truly.) Because she has never known him to run away from a fight, only towards what’s good. Instead she has known that he never backs down. She has known that he is the kind of person worthy of all things good because he’s good and powerful, because of his heart. Because of the fact that he cares and he cares so deeply. It’s always about Sam Wilson’s heart and that makes me feel way too many emotions. 

Isaiah’s Story and the Truth

I’m really glad we finally got to sit down with Isaiah and hear his side of the dark story that left him experimented on and alone. It was, just as imagined, horrifically painful to know especially with the letters, the profound loss, and the system’s injustice towards him that white America has always profited in a way that’s left others scarred.

The world back then is not so different than the world today. It still takes everything from Black men (and women) no matter who they are or what their connections are. The world is still cruel in its racism and lacking in its empathy, therefore, watching two characters who absolutely deserve good share heartache instead broke me. Carl Lumbly and Anthony Mackie beautifully evoked a number of emotions with their words, but so much more in their silence

Sleepovers and Teamwork 

I don’t have anything profound to really say about Bucky coming in to help Sam and his family with the boat, but I do want to talk about every little moment where he smirked (like when he spoke to Sarah for the first time) or when he woke up in the morning and on a coach instead of the floor and just smiled at Sam’s nephews playing with the shield!? I was wrecked to say the least. It was such a pure showcase of just how desperately Bucky wants company and people around him.

Notebooks and Bullets

I don’t understand how this show is making me care about Zemo, but here we are. Bucky taking the bullets out of the gun and refusing to shoot was fascinating, but more than that, it was the glimmer of humanity in Zemo telling Bucky he’s crossed his name off his list because even though the man is chaos personified, it was great to see this moment where it felt like everything aligned properly.

The Dora Milaje are great at everything so whatever they’ve got planned for Zemo, I hope we get to see the aftermath of it someday. Black Panther II possibly?

“Truth” was, without a doubt, the best episode of The Falcon and The Winter Soldier thus far making me so excited for the finale, but simultaneously so sad it’s the end because more episodes like this is what I’ve wanted. The banter and the emotional beats worked so well in the stories they told. This is the first episode I’ve rewatched and the one I’ll likely to rewatch a lot of.

What are your thoughts on “Truth?” What would you highlight from this episode?

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